Typography for your brand

Typography for your brand

Matthew Best

8 September 2020

At pepperit, we live for beautiful branding that cuts through the noise, and so do your own customers and audience. Creating brand-loyal followers can be achieved through a considered mix of compelling messaging and striking typography.  

Big and Bold

What fonts does one choose for a brand project or marketing communications? Typographic trends are as changing as the seasons, and in recent years there’s been an influx of thin or hand drawn styles. In 2020, marketers are opting for bolder font choices, with heavily weighted fonts being used a lot more frequently, especially for big brands.

Heavy fonts give designs a modern, confident, trustworthy feel. They also lend contrast to a composition – one of the cornerstones of design.

Make your marketing material look really impressive – be bold.

Wild and Free

Typography can talk, and it currently has a lot to say! Right now, it’s breaking away from the constraints of usual fonts and shapes.

In the quest for innovative and modern compositions, designers are playing with typography big time. Unique characters and unexpected shapes have replaced traditional serifs and sans serifs, letting a brand speak for itself in ways like never before. This trend is currently flourishing in 2020 and will definitely continue.

Unique characters and unexpected shapes have replaced traditional serifs and sans serifs

Ecofonts

With the state of the world as it is, sustainability is definitely a theme being adopted by designers and marketers.

Many and interesting eco-friendly initiatives have been arising both for printed and digital designs – saving ink from logo printing or energy consumption for digital interfaces, for example.

Ecobranding proposes a more ecological branding design system and is most definitely a future trend. Give back to the world. Go Eco!

With the state of the world as it is, sustainability is definitely a theme being adopted by designers and marketers.

Final design tip from pepper. Don’t confuse legibility with communication. Just because something’s legible, doesn’t mean it communicates, and more importantly doesn’t mean it communicates the right thing.